Women > men (when it comes to investing)

The odds favour women when it comes to making investment decisions. A recent paper from UNSW Business School The gender face-off: Do female traders come out on top in terms of trading performance? – supports the contention women do make better investors.

" While men tend to invest with the goal of achieving capital growth, women generally focus more on the income an asset will produce." Peter Swan, professor of finance at UNSW.

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Professor of finance at UNSW Peter Swan told business.unsw.edu.au investment stereotypes depicting women as conservative investors are wrong.

“Women actually spend more time researching their options than men, are better at matching their investments to their life goals, tend to trade less and when they do, remain calmer during the storms which unnerve male investors on the financial high seas,” he said. 

“Women tend to be more dispassionate than men when investing and trade less, reducing the risk of losses. Studies also show while men tend to invest with the goal of achieving capital growth, women generally focus more on the income an asset will produce."

This story originally appeared at business.unsw.edu.au

Jennifer Farmer is bluenotes editorial producer.

The views and opinions expressed in this communication are those of the author and may not necessarily state or reflect those of ANZ.

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