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Machine learning: change the way you think

Machine learning won’t do all the thinking for businesses in the future but it will change the way they think, according to a panel of experts at ANZ’s Finance & Treasury Forum in October – and help drive productivity as a result.

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“Machine-learning algorithms are changing the way we think about cash or when we're forecasting cash,” Greg Russo, Managing Director, Treasury Operations at General Electric said.

“We have been able to cut in half the amount of excess liquidity that we're holding by using data more effectively.” – Greg Russo“Over the course of the last couple of years we have been able to cut in half the amount of excess liquidity that we're holding by using data more effectively.”

Speaking at the forum in Singapore, Russo said machine learning had transformed the way GE approached its cash on hand.  

“Believe it or not our Treasurer, one of his biggest complaints at the time was ‘on a daily basis how come I don't know how much cash I have?’” he said. “Which seemed like a fairly reasonable question for a Treasurer to ask.”

“We now have a dashboard that is updated four times a day that anybody in our organisation would go on and see how much cash we have, where the cash is, how much is restricted, how much is freely available, by legal entity, by country.”

This article was originally published on ANZ’s Institutional website. Click HERE to read the full article.

Shane White is Content Manager, Institutional at ANZ

The views and opinions expressed in this communication are those of the author and may not necessarily state or reflect those of ANZ.

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